The shocking damage balloons can do to marine life

CLIENT: DEMAND.FILM
OUTLET: NEWS.COM.AU

 While it’s fun for a child to grab a balloon at a shopping centre or play with them at birthday parties, they can be a danger to our marine life if they aren’t disposed of properly because they end up looking like jellyfish.  In a 2012 University of Queensland study, balloons were identified as being disproportionately consumed by sea turtles based how common they were as litter on Queensland beaches.  In other words, the study found that sea turtles specifically target balloons.

While it’s fun for a child to grab a balloon at a shopping centre or play with them at birthday parties, they can be a danger to our marine life if they aren’t disposed of properly because they end up looking like jellyfish.

In a 2012 University of Queensland study, balloons were identified as being disproportionately consumed by sea turtles based how common they were as litter on Queensland beaches.

In other words, the study found that sea turtles specifically target balloons.

International travel inspired this Australian tech entrepreneur to design a device that helps keep women safe -- and now the world is buying it

CLIENT: WANDERSAFE
OUTLET: BUSINESS INSIDER

 Canberra-based Stephenie Rodriguez has visited 54 countries, and as  woman generally travelling alone, knows all too well “what it feels like  to be unsafe”.  So like all entrepreneurs, she set out to solve that problem, enlisting the help of a retired CIA executive, Thomas Pecora, to create WanderSafe, personal device that acts like a personal panic button when you’re out and about alone. She raised $600,000 from angel investors around the national capital to bring her product to reality and it’s already proving to be a hit, with Rodriguez landing a distribution deal in duty free stores globally, as well as another deal with Qatar airways.  For Rodriguez, it’s not just about travel but the safety of women in general, something she’s well aware of in citing local statistics.

Canberra-based Stephenie Rodriguez has visited 54 countries, and as woman generally travelling alone, knows all too well “what it feels like to be unsafe”.

So like all entrepreneurs, she set out to solve that problem, enlisting the help of a retired CIA executive, Thomas Pecora, to create WanderSafe, personal device that acts like a personal panic button when you’re out and about alone. She raised $600,000 from angel investors around the national capital to bring her product to reality and it’s already proving to be a hit, with Rodriguez landing a distribution deal in duty free stores globally, as well as another deal with Qatar airways.

For Rodriguez, it’s not just about travel but the safety of women in general, something she’s well aware of in citing local statistics.

WanderSafe founder heads to US where more VCs will back women

CLIENT: WANDERSAFE
OUTLET: AUSTRALIAN FINANCIAL REVIEW

 Canberra-based entrepreneur Stephenie Rodriguez has lived in Australia for 20 years, is set on raising her daughter here, but the founder of personal safety technology start-up WanderSafe has incorporated her business in the US.  Ms Rodriguez told  The Australian Financial Review  that statistics showing that less than 2 per cent of the total capital pool in Australia was used to back women founders, were a big factor in her deciding it would be easier to create a US company and have some Australian investors involved, rather than try to raise all of its capital here.  "Truthfully, the US is where the money is," she said.

Canberra-based entrepreneur Stephenie Rodriguez has lived in Australia for 20 years, is set on raising her daughter here, but the founder of personal safety technology start-up WanderSafe has incorporated her business in the US.

Ms Rodriguez told The Australian Financial Review that statistics showing that less than 2 per cent of the total capital pool in Australia was used to back women founders, were a big factor in her deciding it would be easier to create a US company and have some Australian investors involved, rather than try to raise all of its capital here.

"Truthfully, the US is where the money is," she said.

'Do what Jesus would do': The controversial ad that promoted 'Dying to Live' organ transplant film

CLIENT: DEMAND.FILM
OUTLET: TODAY SHOW (CHANNEL 9)
OUTLET: 7 NEWS (NATIONAL SYNDICATION)
OUTLET: 9 NEWS (NATIONAL SYNDICATION)
OUTLET: THE PROJECT (NETWORK TEN)
OUTLET: STUDIO TEN (NETWORK TEN)
OUTLET: THE DAILY TELEGRAPH
OUTLET: DAILY MAIL
OUTLET: 3AW NEIL MITCHELL (MELBOURNE)

 A CONTROVERSIAL commercial depicting Jesus Christ consenting to organ donation as he dies on the cross has divided religious leaders.  The Daily Telegraph can reveal the almost three-minute ad, which airs today, encourages viewers to “do what Jesus would do” after an actor portraying Christ is persuaded to donate his organs by two guards.

A CONTROVERSIAL commercial depicting Jesus Christ consenting to organ donation as he dies on the cross has divided religious leaders.

The Daily Telegraph can reveal the almost three-minute ad, which airs today, encourages viewers to “do what Jesus would do” after an actor portraying Christ is persuaded to donate his organs by two guards.

 A controversial advert which shows Jesus Christ agreeing to become an organ donor has infuriated a Muslim leader and divided opinion online.  The two-and-a-half minute advert shows two armed guards asking Jesus if he would like to donate his organs after being nailed to the cross before his death.

A controversial advert which shows Jesus Christ agreeing to become an organ donor has infuriated a Muslim leader and divided opinion online.

The two-and-a-half minute advert shows two armed guards asking Jesus if he would like to donate his organs after being nailed to the cross before his death.

 Neil Mitchell has a question.  Controversial? Or clever?  A new campaign has been launched to convince people to become organ donors.

Neil Mitchell has a question.

Controversial? Or clever?

A new campaign has been launched to convince people to become organ donors.



Film hopes to raise awareness about organ donation

CLIENT: DEMAND.FILM
OUTLET: TODAY SHOW

 Every year, 2,200 potential organ transplants fail to happen in Australia, while 1,400 people wait for the phone call that could ultimately change their life. Sadly, for 150 of them, time will run out before that call comes.   Dying to Live , a new film directed by Richard Todd aims to shine a light on the Aussies on the waiting list.  Dying to Live is screening all over Australia.  For session times and tickets, visit Demand.film .

Every year, 2,200 potential organ transplants fail to happen in Australia, while 1,400 people wait for the phone call that could ultimately change their life. Sadly, for 150 of them, time will run out before that call comes.

Dying to Live, a new film directed by Richard Todd aims to shine a light on the Aussies on the waiting list.

Dying to Live is screening all over Australia. For session times and tickets, visit Demand.film.