The insane creations in Melbourne’s first burger crawl on Chapel Street

CLIENT: CHAPEL STREET PRECINCT
OUTLET: HERALD SUN

If you want bang for your burger, head down to trendy Chapel Street where the strip’s top burger joints have created the craziest and most inventive burgers ever seen.  All to earn votes from the public.  The inaugural Chapel Champion Awards will feature a seven-week campaign with zany burgers, all vying to be crowned Champion Burger Joint.

If you want bang for your burger, head down to trendy Chapel Street where the strip’s top burger joints have created the craziest and most inventive burgers ever seen.

All to earn votes from the public.

The inaugural Chapel Champion Awards will feature a seven-week campaign with zany burgers, all vying to be crowned Champion Burger Joint.

Chapel Champion Award nominations now open

CLIENT: CHAPEL STREET PRECINCT
OUTLET: HERALD SUN

Whether it be a bar, restaurant or beauty salon, Melburnians have the chance to crown their favourite Chapel Street business a champion.

The Chapel Street Precinct Association, in partnership with Metro Tunnel, has introduced the inaugural Chapel Champion Awards to recognise the best businesses in the area.

CSPA general manager Chrissie Maus said she really hoped the awards would rally the community to shop and support local.

“This marketing campaign aims to engage with a record number of our members and their unique offerings,” she said.


Australia's On Demand Film Service Launched Crowd Sourced Equity Funding Raise

CLIENT: DEMAND.FILM
OUTLET: FILMINK

The world’s largest cinema-on-demand chain, Australia’s Demand.film, is giving its 100,000 strong community an opportunity to share in the company’s success when it opens up to investment through equity crowdfunding to help fund its growth and expansion plans.

Demand.film will host its raise through Birchal.com with investors able to own part of the company, disrupting how movies are being seen in cinemas for as little as $100.

Hot on the heels of ride sharing app Shebah’s record breaking $3 million in crowd sourced equity funding, Co-founder and Managing Director David Doepel [pictured] has high hopes for the investment raising, because Demand.film’s community are already familiar with the crowd sourcing model

“Demand.film is an Australian public unlisted company focused on the theatrical release of films using a crowdsourced, single event-screening model through its web platform. Our loyal customers not only love unique cinema experiences, they understand these movies are being seen in cinemas thanks to the crowdsourcing business model,” says Doepel.

The world’s biggest cinema-on-demand chain wants supporters to crowdfund it

CLIENT: DEMAND.FILM
OUTLET: STARTUPDAILY

Perth-based Demand.film is hoping its 110,000-strong customer base will put their money where their eyeballs are, launching a seven-figure equity raise via crowdfunding.

The on-demand cinema startup, which has a catalogue of hundreds of films, predominantly documentaries alongside Australian classics such as Mad Max and Crocodile Dundee, offers crowdsourced, single event-screenings in seven countries, including the US, Canada and UK, using mainstream cinema chains as venues. Around 40,000 customers are based in Australia, delivering around a quarter of the company’s revenue. It’s been described as Airbnb for movies. 

Co-founder and Managing Director David Doepel (pictured), a former producer and documentary filmmaker, launched the business in 2013 as a film distribution company before rebranding as Demand.film in 2016. He wants to double the number of countries the business operates in by the end of 2020. 

“Our loyal customers not only love unique cinema experiences, they understand these movies are being seen in cinemas thanks to the crowdsourcing business model,” he said.



A new Australian seafood ordering app has launched

CLIENT: SHORETRADE
OUTLET: FOODSERVICE AUSTRALIA

[IN COLLABORATION WITH OUR SISTER AGENCY  NEON BLACK ]  Shoretrade, a new online  ordering platform for Australian seafood, has launched with more than  3,000 seafood industry suppliers and buyers banding together to disrupt  how seafood is bought and sold in Australia.  The aim is to cut out the fishmonger middle man, increase produce transparency, and deliver seafood direct from the boats to buyer.  The app, which took two years to design, is striving for fresher seafood for the chef and the Australian buying public, with more money going back to smaller fishers and aquaculture farmers.

[IN COLLABORATION WITH OUR SISTER AGENCY NEON BLACK]

Shoretrade, a new online ordering platform for Australian seafood, has launched with more than 3,000 seafood industry suppliers and buyers banding together to disrupt how seafood is bought and sold in Australia.

The aim is to cut out the fishmonger middle man, increase produce transparency, and deliver seafood direct from the boats to buyer.

The app, which took two years to design, is striving for fresher seafood for the chef and the Australian buying public, with more money going back to smaller fishers and aquaculture farmers.

Demand Film looks to tap equity crowdfunding for expansion

CLIENT: DEMAND.FILM
OUTLET: INSIDE FILM

Cinema on-demand operator Demand Film aims to raise a seven-figure sum via an equity crowdfunding platform to accelerate its global roll-out and ramp up the volume of releases.  Co-founder and MD David Doepel is confident its 110,000 customers, of whom 40,000 are in Australia, will respond to the opportunity to buy shares in the company which launched in 2014.  Today it invited expressions of interest via  Birchal.com  but the precise sum it is seeking won’t be revealed until the formal launch of the equity crowdfunding campaign in about three weeks.  Doepel tells IF the goal is to raise somewhere between $1 million and $2 million by June 30, which would dilute the stakes held by himself and co-founders Andrew Hazelton and Barbara Connell.

Cinema on-demand operator Demand Film aims to raise a seven-figure sum via an equity crowdfunding platform to accelerate its global roll-out and ramp up the volume of releases.

Co-founder and MD David Doepel is confident its 110,000 customers, of whom 40,000 are in Australia, will respond to the opportunity to buy shares in the company which launched in 2014.

Today it invited expressions of interest via Birchal.com but the precise sum it is seeking won’t be revealed until the formal launch of the equity crowdfunding campaign in about three weeks.

Doepel tells IF the goal is to raise somewhere between $1 million and $2 million by June 30, which would dilute the stakes held by himself and co-founders Andrew Hazelton and Barbara Connell.

Legal cannabis could earn $1b tax revenue and create 250,000 jobs

CLIENT: THE GREEN FUND
OUTLET: 9 NEWS

It’s 2019 and marijuana is now recreationally legal in Canada and across 10 states in the US.  And it appears allowing adults to legally purchase and consume cannabis is big business.  According to  The State of Legal Marijuana Markets  report, Canadians spent $A2.28 billion on legal weed in 2018, with the Colorado Department of Revenue saying the state’s regulated pot industry has generated more than $A8.5 billion in sales since legal recreational marijuana sales began in 2014.  Investment strategist Mark Bernberg said Australia was losing billions of dollars of potential tax revenue from legal marijuana, questioning why it’s not being addressed on the election campaign.  “It’s a product very much like alcohol and gambling that’s recession proof because it’s a product of recreational consumption for adults,” he told nine.com.au.

It’s 2019 and marijuana is now recreationally legal in Canada and across 10 states in the US.

And it appears allowing adults to legally purchase and consume cannabis is big business.

According to The State of Legal Marijuana Markets report, Canadians spent $A2.28 billion on legal weed in 2018, with the Colorado Department of Revenue saying the state’s regulated pot industry has generated more than $A8.5 billion in sales since legal recreational marijuana sales began in 2014.

Investment strategist Mark Bernberg said Australia was losing billions of dollars of potential tax revenue from legal marijuana, questioning why it’s not being addressed on the election campaign.

“It’s a product very much like alcohol and gambling that’s recession proof because it’s a product of recreational consumption for adults,” he told nine.com.au.